What are the secrets to a long and healthy Life?

Some families have the good fortune to live very long lives . . .We want to know about those families!

Welcome to Long Life Family Study

The multicenter LLFS enrolled and studied a unique sample of 4,953 participants in 539 pedigrees in the USA and Denmark which are enriched for familial EL. Through two extensive in-home visits, approximately 8 years apart, these families possess key healthy aging phenotypes (HAPs) in major domains of the aging process (cognitive, cardiovascular, metabolic, inflammatory, etc.). Further, the measured phenotypes are highly heritable cross-sectionally and longitudinally; however considerable familial phenotypic heterogeneity is present. To better understand this heterogeneity and the why and how these families are protected we will: conduct a third in-home visit with existing participants; recruit and enroll the grandchildren of the proband generation for their initial visit; combine linkage and association analyses to identify rare and lineage specific variants for cross-sectional and longitudinal HAPs and EL and their interaction with lifestyle exposures; perform comprehensive OMICs on LLFS pedigrees to discover biologic mechanisms leading to the heterogeneous familial patterns of HAPs and EL in LLFS pedigrees, and discover additional causal variants. Finally, we will combine all the data using systems biology and data integration to more comprehensively explain the biology of healthy aging.

The purpose of the LLFS is to study families in the United States and Denmark that are ALL enriched for exceptional longevity (EL). EL is a complex trait that is likely influenced by multiple genes with small effects interacting with lifetime exposures. The knowledge gained from studying these families will be in why and how they are protected and thus living exceptionally healthy long lives.

LLFS Project Members

Thomas Perls MD, MPH

Boston University Field Center Principal Investigator

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617-353-2020
thperls@bu.edu

Melissa Berlin, BA

Research Assistant

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617-353-0778
mberlin@bu.edu

Andrew Emili PhD

Co-Investigator LLFS, Biology and Biochemistry

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617-353-2080
stacy@bu.edu

View all Boston members join us today

Dr. Lawrence S. Honig

LLFS Morbidity and mortality adjudication; Telomeres in aging

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617-353-0778
lh456@columbia.edu

Dr. R. Graham Barr

LLFS Spirometry reading center and training

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617-353-0778
rgb9@cumc.columbia.edu

Kathleen Chan

Research Assistant

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3477579030
kc2963@cumc.columbia.edu

View all New York Members join us today

Kaare Christensen, DMSc

PI

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+45 6550 3049
kchristensen@helath.sdu.dk

Qihua Tan, MD PhD

Researcher

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+45 6550 3536
qtan@health.sdu.dk

Gitte Bay Christensen

Nurse, Site coordinator

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+45 6550 3040
gbchristensen@health.sdu.dk

View all Denmark Members join us today

Anne B Newman, MD, MPH

Prinicipal Investigator

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617-353-2020
anewman@pitt.edu

Joseph M Zmuda, PhD

Principal Investigator

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617-353-0778
zmudaj@edc.pitt.edu

Adena Bowden, BS

Research Assistant

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8148535327
adb163@pitt.edu

View all Pittsburgh members join us today

Key Publications

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NIA news and tools

The latest research news from the National Institute on Aging at NIH

For media inquiries and or to request an interview with a subject matter expert, please email the NIA Office of Communications and Public Liaison at nianews3@mail.nih.gov, or call 301/496-1752.

For information about upcoming NIA events »

Walking speed at age 45 linked to physical well-being, brain health

January 02, 2020

Walking speed at age 45 was associated not only with physical health but also with brain health in midlife and even early childhood, according to an NIA-supported study readmore…

Common genetic disorder found to cause serious disease and disability with age

December 27, 2019

New research has revealed that hemochromatosis—a genetic condition that causes more than a million Americans to absorb too much iron from their diets—is a much more serious cause of disease and disability than previously thought readmore…

Publications

The Future of Ageing

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The Future of Ageing

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The Future of Ageing

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